Sunday, July 15, 2012

Preparing Royal Icing

My goal for this post is for you to learn something new you didn't know about royal icing, and to show you that with a little practice (and patience), you can make some cute cookies!

First of all you need to have 4 ingredients on hand; powdered sugar, meringue powder, any flavor oil free extract, and water. Pretty simple! For those of you that are unfamiliar with meringue powder, you can find it at Hobby Lobby, Joann's, or even Wal Mart. Look for it in the baking section. (pic below)

I always make my icing in my standard size Kitchen Aid mixer. I don't recommend using a mixer with a bigger bowl because I have found it doesn't seem to mix as well.

Now to make your icing!!!


Empty one bag of powdered sugar into your mixing bowl. Put 6 TBS of meringue powder in the bowl with your powder sugar and using your whisk attachment blend the sugar and powder. While you are blending your sugar and powder, grab a cup and mix 3/4 cup water with 1 TBS of any flavor extract. Slowly add the water mixture to your mixing bowl (with your mixer running) until you don't see any dry powder. When the powder is absorbed, turn your mixer speed to med-high, and set your timer for 4 minutes. After the four minutes is up, run a spatula around the sides of the bowl to incorporate any unmixed powder. Check the texture of your icing, it should form stiff peaks when your spatula is pulled away. You may need to mix your icing longer, I set my timer for 1 minute increments and check it until it is ready.

As soon as your icing is ready, transfer it to an airtight bowl. Make sure it is airtight. Air makes royal icing harden quickly.



IMPORTANT: Make sure your mixing bowl, and everything else you use to make the icing is clean and oil free. Oil and royal icing are not friends.

Royal Icing is good for a month if it is stored air tight in the refrigerator. I personally don't like to keep it longer than a week. Everyone has different preferences and you will find your own the more you make it and see what works for you!



Now you are ready to make your piping and filling icings. This recipe should ice around 4 dozen cookies. I double this recipe and it usually lasts me around 8 dozen cookies.



I'm excited to hear your feedback! If you use this and learn something new, let me know! If there is something I didn't cover that you have questions about feel free to ask. I will cover mixing and preparing piping and fillier icing next. Too much to cover in one post!



Happy Icing Making! :)

13 comments:

  1. I am so excited about these tutorials! Thank you for sharing your tips...your cookies are beautiful!

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    1. Thank you so much! I love to hear you are excited, it makes me anxious to share more :)

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  2. Thank you for doing the tutorial. I never thought to make sure my flavoring was oil free, I will have to check this. I always started by mixing the meringue powder with water until foamy then adding the powdered sugar. I look forward to trying it your way and seeing how that works, I also look forward to your post on preparing piping and filler icing!

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    1. You are so welcome! It is easy to grab extract with oil in it, so definitely double check! Everyone has a different method that works for them, but I hope this ends up being another option for you that works well!

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  3. So interesting! Like Kristy I always start out mixing meringue powder and water first then add in the sugar along with a tablespoon of corn syrup. I think I got this recipe from Bridgett at Bakeat350.

    I want to go make some cookies right now so I can try this method!

    Question: When you flood a cookie in white have you ever had it turn yellowish after it dries overnight? I have this happen occasionally and been told it's the wilton meringue powder.

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    1. I hope this works for you! It is so simple.I haven't had the issue with the white icing turning yellow, but its probably because I ALWAYS color my white icing white. Ha! You would not believe the difference in a "white" icing with no food color, and a white icing after it has been colored with white food dye. I'll post more on this for sure :)

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  5. Just wanted to follow up. I made royal icing last night following your directions and I was surprised by how differently the texture of the icing turned out. I wasn't sure if this was your piping icing, but when i tried to pipe with it, it was too stiff and cracked easily so I thinned it down. Look forward your tutorial on icing consistency! Overall I think they turned out pretty well and the icing was easy to work with, will definitely use your method again.

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  6. I am trying to find your piping and filling icing tutorial but am not seeing it here. Would you be willing to email it to me. I promise I am FAR from a cookie decorator so there will be no competition from me :) Boren.corinne@gmail.com

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  7. How long does it take for this icing to 'set' on the cookies? Set enough that you can stack them if need be?

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  9. This post states that you were going to post flooding and piping icing tutorials and I can't seem to find them anywhere on here :( did you take them down??

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  10. Thank you so much for this walk through! Im using this recipe today to make some Christmas cookies.

    Quick question, for a filling icing would I add more water to this recipe or would I use less meringue powder?

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